Malaysia to host delayed 2013 Women’s Squash World Championship

Kuala Lumpur, Jan 11: The Malaysian state of Penang will host the delayed 2013 Women’s World Squash Championship in March following an agreement concluded Saturday by the Women’s Squash Association (WSA).

The event, boasting a $120,000 prize-fund, will get underway March 17 at the Nicol David International Squash Centre with the later rounds staged on an all-glass showcourt at the 10,000-seater Penang International Sports Arena.

It will be the third time in the 35-year history of this World Squash Federation (WSF) title that the WSA’s premier event has been staged in Malaysia – but the first time in Penang, the home of defending champion and World No.1 Nicol David.

The Malaysian sporting icon who this month celebrated a historic 90th successive month at the top of the world rankings, will have the perfect setting to extend her record to eight world titles since 2005.

Penang, which hosted the Women’s World Junior Championships in 2001, has a great tradition of developing squash talent. Not only is the island David’s birthplace, but also that of World No.6 Low Wee Wern and men’s star Ong Beng Hee.

“The Penang State government has really made this a special moment for me and also Low Wee Wern – having the World Championship in our very own hometown in Penang,” said David here. “After winning my fifth World title, there was talk by the state government on how they would be able to bring the World Championships to Penang one day.

“This support by them taking a huge role in hosting the World Championship is truly amazing.”

WSA Chairman Ingrid Lofdahl-Bentzer added: “It is fantastic news for the WSA to be able to announce this event. We are very grateful to Penang and everyone involved for their dedication and continued support. I have no doubt that the players share my excitement and will be looking forward to a fantastic World Championship.”

The 2014 edition will take place later in the year, details of which are expected to be announced in due course.

IANS